logo.jpg (16945 bytes)

logo1.jpg (15400 bytes)
This web site is a part of the heritage project taken up
by Prabal Pramanik’s Academy of Arts


Bhamlada, Bhatwan, Punjab-145 022, India
Web site : www.academyartprabal.com
e-mail : prabalpramanik@yahoo.co.uk

photo1.jpg (39611 bytes)

HISTORY OF
CHAMBA
AN ARTIST'S VIEW
OF CHAMBA
FESTIVAL OF
CHAMBA
TEMPLES OF
CHAMBA
BOOKS, PORTFOLIOS
& CDS ON CHAMBA
PHOTO
GALLERY
TOURISM
INFORMATION
DEVELOPMENT
OF CHAMBA
LIFE IN
CHAMBA
TRIBAL PEOPLE OF
CHAMBA HILLS
TRADITIONAL
ARCHITECTURE
ART OF
CHAMBA
ARTISTS OF
CHAMBA
CONTACT


Gaddis and Gujjars


The tribal people of Chamba belong to separate anthropological groups as proven by their distinctive features and customs.
The two major groups, Gaddis and Gujjars are seminomadic frops who were perhaps full nomads at some times.
Gujjars are likely to have come from Kashmir as many Gujjars stay in Kashmir too. The border of Chamba with Kashmir provided routes for there nomadic herdsmen of Islamic community.
Their feature are middle-eastern and from their features and customs I infer that they originally came from middle east. These nomadic tribesmen have their own language and culture and have kept more or less aloof from the political senario of Chamba in olden times.
They travel to lowland Punjab every Autumn with their lives stock to avoid the cold winter of the hills. Later when the weather warms up they return to the hills in Chamba district.
Prabal Pramanik

The original home of the Gaddis yet a matter that is not absolutely clear, but it is quite possible that they came from the plains to avoid prosecution. According their tradition the came at the time of king Aja Burman 730 - 800 but it is rather uncertain to determine this.
The Giddis are a separate clan. The term Gaddi is a generic name, and under it are included Brahmans, Rajputs, Khatris, Thakkurs and Rathis. The majority, however, are Khatris. As the custom of the Brahman and Rajput sections is to return themselves under their caste names, it is improbable that many of these have been classed as Gaddis. The census returns may, therefore, be regarded as including, chiefly, the Khatri, Thakkur and Rathi sections of the clan. They are found principally in the Brahmaur Wazarat, which is called Gadaran, but also in other parts of the State. (Gadaran, from Skr. gadar " a eheep " and meaning " sheep country," and gaddi " a shepherd.")

 

Gujjars

ch-ph28.jpg (29218 bytes)    ch-ph29.jpg (26097 bytes)   ch-ph32.jpg (23155 bytes)

 

ch-ph30.jpg (28578 bytes) 

ch-ph46.jpg (24136 bytes)     ch-ph50.jpg (27425 bytes)  

 

 

 

Gaddis

ch-ph43.jpg (22977 bytes)       ch-ph49.jpg (27843 bytes)

 ch-ph44.jpg (21209 bytes)    ch-ph47.jpg (29293 bytes)

 

DSC_0035.JPG (14486 bytes)        DSC_0042.JPG (16967 bytes)

DSC_0061.JPG (19120 bytes)      DSC_0063.JPG (17807 bytes)

DSC_0093.JPG (18441 bytes)      DSC_0155.JPG (18059 bytes)

 

 

 

YOU ARE WELCOME TO
VISIT OUR OTHER WEB SITES

www.papercuttingartprabal.com
www.academyartprabal.com
www.artprabal.com
www.pathankotheritage.com
www.orientbookco.com

ch-ph27.jpg (24950 bytes)

ch-ph31.jpg (26487 bytes)

ch-ph48.jpg (30680 bytes)

DSC_0097.JPG (16397 bytes)

DSC_0164.JPG (17936 bytes)

DSC_0036.JPG (15593 bytes)

 

Web design by Arup Chandra
Multimedia Studio, Bhamlada, Bhatwan, Punjab 145 022, India
Pictures and text copyright reserved by Prabal Pramanik